60 posts in Q&A Profiles

Q & A with Emilie Franke

Why did you decide to pursue a Master of Marine Affairs?
After working in fisheries and ecosystem management for four years, I knew I wanted to stay in the marine policy field, but I needed a Master’s degree to advance my career. I wanted a graduate program that focused on the intersection of science and policy and that would expand my knowledge of the field. 

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Q & A with Ann Farr

Alumna Ann Farr graduated from the School of Marine Affairs in 1982 and is now an Environmental Manager/State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) Responsible Official for two major port projects on the Columbia River. We had a chance to catch up with Ann and hear about her job, her time at SMA, and advice she has for current SMEA students.
Can you give us a brief description of what you do? 

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Q & A with Ryan Swanson

Why did you decide to pursue a Master of Marine Affairs?
It mostly began while I was studying zoology at University of Wisconsin-Madison, including studying abroad in Ecuador for a tropical and marine conservation and ecology semester. While on the coast, we visited a fishing village and I realized there are a lot of people and communities that rely on this type of work as a means for a living. 

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Q & A with Alex Stote

Why did you decide to pursue a Master of Marine Affairs?
I made the decision to go back to graduate school while in the middle of a new job search a few years ago. I come from a natural science background, but the job descriptions that attracted me most required a mix of natural and social science training. I realized that to be competitive in the job market, I would need to diversify my analytical skills and learn how to think critically about marine issues from a social science perspective. 

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Q & A with Dan Herlihy

Alumnus Dan R. Herlihy graduated from the School of Marine Affairs in 1985 and is now a Senior Marine Consultant for the The Gerson Lehrman Group. We had a chance to catch up with Dan and hear about his job, his time at SMA, and advice he has for current SMEA students.
Can you give us a brief description of what you do? 

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Q & A with Zelin Chen

Why did you decide to pursue a Master of Marine Affairs?
My 4-year undergraduate training in marine resource and environment planted me with a great interest in this field. With passion to explore the field of marine conservation and fishery management further, I spent my time working in environmental NGO. The working experience in NGO determined my interest in engaging in this field, but I felt I wanted to have a more specialized and systematic understanding in my work. 

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Q & A with alumna Breena Apgar-Kurtz

Alumna Breena Apgar-Kurtz graduated from the School of Marine and Environmental Affairs in 2012 and is now a Fishery Management Biologist for the Lummi Nation. We had a chance to catch up with Breena and hear about her job, her time at SMEA, and advice she has for current SMEA students.
Can you give us a brief description of what you do? 

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Q & A with Samantha Farquhar

Why did you decide to pursue a Master of Marine Affairs?
I came from a more traditional marine biology background, and used to be quite happy just studying fishes. After a while, I realized that all of the environmental issues I was really concerned with had to do with people. I realized that I needed more training in social sciences and policy in addition to my existing biology skills. 

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Q & A with Tressa Arbow

Why did you decide to pursue a Master of Marine Affairs?
As an undergrad I studied Government and African Studies and I was originally interested in international education policy. I taught English as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Rwanda for two years and taught middle school in Austin for a few after that, and throughout that time I was becoming more and more interested in environmental issues. 

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Q & A with Kelly Cribari

Why did you decide to pursue a Master of Marine Affairs?
During my undergraduate career, I studied Marine Biology, took many lab classes, and spent my time focusing on ecological questions. I began to realize, however, that how I viewed my work as a scientist was different from how it was perceived by the public and by policymakers using the research to make decisions. 

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