82 posts in Q&A Profiles

Q&A with Dr. Erendira Aceves Bueno

Why did you decide to become a professor?
I love science and academia has given me an immense freedom to explore the topics that interest me. Becoming a professor has allowed me to maintain a profession driven by curiosity while modestly contributing to solving pressing problems. I feel extremely lucky for that.
What do you like most about your work?
Many things, but I mostly enjoy facing intellectual challenges in collaboration with students. 

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Q&A with Kalloway Page

Why did you decide to come to UW’s SMEA for graduate school?
After graduating UW as an undergraduate I took a few years off to work as a seasonal environmental consultant to gain hands on professional  experience in the marine science realm.   I was interested  in going back to grad school, but I wanted to make sure that I could make a living.   

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Q&A with Dr. Terrie Klinger

How did you decide to become a professor?

I don’t recall making a discrete decision to become a professor. I loved my undergraduate studies at UC Berkeley and benefited enormously from the mentorship of several faculty members there, particularly Paul Silva, John West, and GF Papenfuss. It seemed like the most natural thing in the world to move on to graduate school, where I had wonderful experiences at the University of British Columbia and at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. 

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A young woman wearing a gray sweatshirt and black leggings is shown from the hips up, holding two pieces of raw salmon in the air at shoulder height.

Q&A with Corinne Noufi

Why did you decide to come to UW’s SMEA for graduate school?
I studied biology as an undergraduate, but it wasn’t until I took a conservation biology class that I began to understand how important the human dimension aspect of climate science is. Following this class, I traveled to Cambodia as part of a research project focusing on food web ecology and fisheries in the Mekong. 

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Q&A with Sam Klein

Why did you decide to come to UW’s SMEA for graduate school?
I decided to come to SMEA because I had been working in labs as a research assistant studying many things from soil microbial ecology to bat acoustics to rocky shore biodiversity, but I wanted to gain an understanding of the policies that shape environmental management and governance. I am especially passionate about coastal ecosystems because I grew up in Hong Kong and love these dynamic habitats.  

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Q&A with Bridget Harding

Why did you decide to pursue a Master of Marine Affairs?
Growing up in the scorching, drought-stricken Sonoran Desert made my annual family trip to San Diego really special. I was always amazed by the waves, the seashells, and the pure joy everyone experiences at the beach. When I finally visited my first aquarium (shoutout to the Birch Aquarium!) I became even more fascinated with the world below the waves. 

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A white, adult man is wearing a green jacket, orange turtle neck, a blue backpack, black hat with sunglasses propped on the brim, and is holding ski poles in each hand. He's shown from the waist up standing on snow with trees in the background.

Q&A with Henry Bell

Why did you decide to pursue a Master of Marine Affairs?
After college, I spent four months in the Caribbean conducting environmental research and filming a documentary to raise awareness about some of the more pressing issues facing marine
environments. In 2016, I began teaching marine policy to undergraduates in the South Pacific for Sea Education Association, an ocean research and sailing program. 

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SMEA student Chris Boylan stands in a gray sweatshirt and black biking shorts wearing a bike helmet. He stands in front of an interpretive sign with two red bicycles, one on either side of him. There's a body of water in the distance.

Q&A with Chris Boylan

Why did you decide to pursue a Master of Marine Affairs?
I decided to pursue a graduate degree chasing the idea that reconnecting coastal communities to their green and blue spaces would lead to a higher quality of life in those regions as well as generate more preparedness as those communities begin to adapt to the effects of climate change.
Why did you decide to come to UW’s SMEA for graduate school? 

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Head shot of SMEA student Marlena Skrobe.

Q&A with Marlena Skrobe

Why did you decide to pursue a Master of Marine Affairs?
I double majored in Marine Affairs and Visual Journalism with a focus on anthropology for my undergraduate studies while at the University of Miami in Florida. I then worked in the film industry for a number of years as a camera assistant and casting director in New York City in order to learn more about the technical side of filmmaking. 

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SMEA student Stephanie Wolek is crouched in clear, shallow water alongside a rocky coastline. Boulders of various sizes are spread along the shore.

Q&A with Stephanie Wolek

Why did you decide to pursue a Master of Marine Affairs?
I actually came across the program by chance. I was looking at the University of Washington’s degree programs and saw “Marine Affairs”. I wasn’t totally sure what it was, but it piqued my interest. I ended up spending hours on the website and realized that this was the right program for me. 

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