Congratulations SMEA Class of 2015

This year the School of Marine & Environmental Affairs graduated fourteen students with an eclectic mix of research topics ranging from communicating environmental science through art, to oil pollution prevention strategies in the arctic. 

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Brian Tracey wins College of the Environment Diversity Award

On May 14th, Brian Tracey became the first awardee of the College of the Environment’s Outstanding Diversity Commitment Award. Among 42 nominees across the College of the Environment including faculty, staff and students, Brian was selected for his efforts and impact not only at the department or university level, but in the Seattle community as a whole.  

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Q & A With Dr. Eddie Allison

How did you decide to become a professor?
I am an accidental academic. Neither of my parents went to college – and I didn’t know any professors before I started university. I ignored career advice  at school that I was best suited to the law or diplomatic service and I did a marine biology degree because I liked the sea and had a notion that adventures could be had either on it or in it. 

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ALLISON’S PAPER ON SEAFOOD SUPPLY PUBLISHED IN SCIENCE

Professor Eddie Allison participated in research to evaluate the effectiveness of fishery improvement projects in his Science publication titled, “Secure sustainable seafood from developing countries.” 

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Kristina Beverlin

Q & A with Kristina Beverlin

What led you to pursue a Master of Marine Affairs?
I would like to help bring attention and understanding about marine issues to the general public.
Why did you choose UW’s SMEA for graduate school?
I had been told that it is one of the most distinguished marine programs in the world.
What are you writing your thesis about and why? 

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Q & A with Max Mossler

What led you to pursue a Master of Marine Affairs?
I love social-ecological relationships. It is fascinating to study how people rely on and interact with their natural environments.
Why did you choose UW’s SMEA for graduate school?
The interdisciplinary approach to environmental problems.
What are you writing your thesis about and why? If you haven’t decided, what do you think you might write about and why? 

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Q & A with Liliana Bastian

What led you to pursue a Master of Marine Affairs?
Immediately after getting my B.S., I didn’t have the right skills and network for the marine conservation and development jobs I wanted. I knew the M.M.A. would give me important social science and professional experience that I didn’t pursue in undergrad.
Why did you choose UW’s SMEA for graduate school?
UW’s SMEA has world-class faculty that, to me, other programs don’t compare to. 

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Q & A with Dr. David Fluharty

How did you decide to become a professor?
In High School one of my civic affairs teachers talked about a particular natural resource management controversy that intrigued me. She let me borrow her Master’s thesis on the topic. I realized then that I wanted to do research to understand how to improve natural resource management. That led to the design of my idiosyncratic undergraduate curriculum that sought exposure to natural and policy sciences to explore how the two could mutually inform each other. 

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Q & A with Dr. Ryan Kelly

How did you decide to become a professor?
In my case, it wasn’t a very direct path, and I wasn’t quite sure where I would end up. But being a professor brings together a lot of things that I enjoy; it’s a nice balance of research, teaching, writing, and so on. It can be collaborative or solitary, and can take you all over the world. 

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Kelly’s latest article published in Environmental Law

Assistant Professor Ryan Kelly’s latest article, “Will More Better, Cheaper, and Faster Monitoring Improve Environmental Management?” has been published in Environmental Law Review, the law journal from Lewis & Clark Law School in Portland, OR (Volume 44, Number 4, 2014. pp. 1111-1147.)
In this article, Dr. Kelly addresses how the use of new technologies for genetic analysis allow for more powerful and more cost-effective environmental data collection, and the impacts that data will have on management decisions and practices. 

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